Moustache Movement: Focus on men’s health

Press Release

The Nursing in Practice November/December issue is now available in print, online and as an app.

Justin Coghlan, the co-founder of the Movember Foundation talks men’s health and explains why the foundation’s aim is to see men living longer. “Men don’t talk, don’t take action and are dying too young. We want to change that, ” he says.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence’s (NICE) new guidance is also outlined in this issue, which includes: preventing disability, fragility and onset dementia in later life; recognising, assessing and managing coeliac disease; learning disabilities and challenging behaviour; and care at home for older people.

Nurses can also catch up on all the latest healthcare news, including stories on: sugar tax, the mental health passport, revalidation, new reports on female genital mutilation, and a mental health app.

Revalidation will be put in place from April 2016, which will require nurses to revalidate every three years in order to uphold their registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC), this is explained in detail in magazine’s feature. Dr Gavin Jamie a GP practicing in Swindon, Niall Dickson the chief executive of the General Medical Council, Janet Kelly the chief matron in care at home for older people.

Nurses can also catch up on all the latest healthcare news, including stories on: sugar tax, the mental health passport, revalidation, new reports on female genital mutilation, and a mental health app.

Revalidation will be put in place from April 2016, which will require nurses to revalidate every three years in order to uphold their registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC), this is explained in detail in magazine’s feature. Dr Gavin Jamie a GP practicing in Swindon, Niall Dickson the chief executive of the General Medical Council, Janet Kelly the chief matron in community services at Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust and  Marilyn Eveleigh a nurse advisor and independent trainer all comment on the new checks nurses face.

Richard Henry, a lecturer in cancer nursing at Queens University Belfast explains why cancer specialist nurses play a key role in patients’ cancer journeys and why they are needed now more than ever due to a growing rate of cancer diagnosis. He says: “There seems to be general unanimity that cancer clinical nurse specialists make a valuable contribution to the quality and effectiveness of cancer treatment and care. Despite this, their numbers and availability are inadequate to meet the growing demand for their input.”

This issue’s nurse profile talks to mental health nurse Glen Sturdee about his experience working with mental health patients around the globe, in Australia, UK, Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Qatar and the Falklands Islands. Sturdee has worked with post-traumatic stress, alcohol rehabilitation, bipolar affective disorder and drug induced psychosis and schizophrenia patients. But he says the thing he finds hardest while working as a mental health nurse is “very dysfunctional families where the children are suffering, and you know that in some cases the children are going to be returned to families that love them but still hurt them.”

The 13 clinical, peer-reviewed papers include the following: managing the diabetic foot, early diagnosis in COPD patients, motivating people to lose weight, burn wound infections in children, HIV and AIDs, human papillomavirus, low back pain, movement and balance disorders, aftercare and prevention of falls in older people, prostate cancer, early diagnosis in cancer patients and anger management in primary care.